Dave Dolkas
Dave Dolkas

Book

MAP a Complex Case: A Guide for Managing, Analyzing, and

Presenting a High-Risk Case

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About MAP a Complex Case

MAP a Complex Case guides lawyers in managing a litigation team, organizing and synthesizing evidence into a compelling narrative, and effectively presenting evidence at trial. By following the skilled instruction of this comprehensive manual, complete with discussion questions and practical examples, readers will grasp the fundamental techniques that underpin successful legal representation from inception through trial.

I use the initialism MAP because litigators and trial lawyers responsible for prosecuting or defending a high-risk case Manage, Analyze, and, ultimately, Present the proof points to a judge or jury. The goal in presenting the case is to tell a memorable, emotionally believable, and intellectually honest story presented in a way that is easy for others to visualize.

The book is divided into four parts. Part 1 (Chapters 1 through 6) covers Managing the case. Part 2 (Chapters 7 through 12) covers Analyzing the case record. Part 3 (Chapters 13 through 16) covers Presentation principles. Part 4 (Chapters 17 and 18) offers two approaches for reviewing the case and team performance.

The book progresses in a logical instructional sequence, starting off with chapters on managing, then moving to analysis, then to presentation, and, finally, to review. I wrote each chapter mindful of the previous chapters. But each chapter can also be read as a stand-alone piece—meaning if you need guidance on how to prepare an effective litigation budget, you can read Chapter 9, “Creating the Litigation Budget,” without having to read the entire book. I do, however, strongly encourage you to read every chapter and address the discussion questions at the end of each chapter.

The fourth edition of MAP a Complex Case was published by Full Court Press, a division of Fastcase, and is available through the Fastcase bookstore and on the Fastcase Legal Research System